<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 6.5.7638.1">
<TITLE>Clinical exams &amp; Authentic Assessments</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<!-- Converted from text/plain format -->

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Dear Rasch Colleagues;<BR>
<BR>
One of the groups with whom I am affiliated administer Clinical examinations to examinee physicians earning certification.&nbsp; The clinicals as this group calls them, amount to a random selection of patient charts from a list of logs kept during the year.&nbsp; The examiners review these charts with the candidate and assess them for clarity, process, critical thinking, etc.<BR>
<BR>
Using Facets, I have structured the analyses using common judge equating.&nbsp; The candidates are unique, and the cases are all unique as well.&nbsp; For instance, even if an &quot;appendix&quot; or &quot;gall bladder&quot; case were requested of all surgeons, each case is a unique patient, and no two can be seen as alike.&nbsp; We've tried t consider them as similar items, but there are simply too many variables within the cases to warrant that conclusion.&nbsp; Common judge equating is clearly the weakest linkage, even through extensive training.&nbsp; Furthermore, there are few common judges to link.&nbsp; Out of a total of 50 examinees, for instance, a single judge may only rate 3 or 4 examinees.<BR>
<BR>
I've been exploring other models of &quot;authentic assessment&quot; and qualitative approaches, yet few can pass the muster of legal defensibility.&nbsp; Any suggestions beyond those mentioned??<BR>
<BR>
Gregory E. Stone, Ph.D., M.A.<BR>
Assistant Professor, Research and Measurement<BR>
University of Toledo, College of Education, Mailstop #923<BR>
</FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
</HTML>