<html>
<body>
One additional advantage of B-H methods compared to Bonferroni is that
the B-H also works when test statistics are correlated. This is very
important since tests for DIF are correlated.<br><br>
No DIF requires that items and other person covariates are conditionally
independent given the <b><i>latent</i></b> trait variable. The only model
where items and covariates&nbsp; also are conditionally independent given
the <b><i>manifest</i></b> person score is the Rasch model where the
score is a sufficient statistic.Tests of conditional independence of
items and covariates given the total score using either Partial gamma
coefficients or Mantel-Haenszel methods are therefore Rasch-based
methods.<br><br>
Remember also, that DIF is uniform if and only if the item x covariate x
score table fits a two-factor loglinear model. The Rasch model applies in
the different&nbsp; subpopulations defined by the values of the
covariate, but item parameters of the biased items are different.
Comparisons within subpopulations are objective. Comparisons across
subpopulations are not.<br><br>
Svend <br><br>
<br><br>
At 06:26 07-02-2006 -0600, Fred Wolfe wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite>Hi Mike,<br><br>
I am not expert on the Benjamina-Hochberg method. I understand that there
are modifications of BH, but it seems that the original BH is still the
predominant method now (from what I could see looking at the
literature).<br><br>
BH would seem to have important advantages over Bonferroni.<br><br>
This issue came up when a colleague was examining DIF using non-Rasch
methods. Using the model form: Item score = Exogenous variable +
Questionnaire Total, this was examined by 3 methods (with different
results) that had been used in the literature:<br><br>
Partial gamma coefficient (Stata)<br>
Kendal's tau b coefficient (SAS)<br>
Variance estimation using bootstrap methods<br><br>
Perhaps someone might have comments as to the usefulness/validity of
Rasch vs. non-Rasch methods for detecting DIF.<br><br>
Fred<br><br>
<br>
At 04:45 PM 2/6/2006, Mike Linacre (RMT) wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite>Thank you, Randy and 
Fred,<br><br>
The Benjamini, Y. &amp; Hochberg, Y. (1995) method for multiple
comparisons appears to be:<br>
(1) Compute individual p-values for each of the N hypothesis tests as
though each was the only one.<br>
(2) Sort the N p-values by size ascending, n=1,N, so that p(1) is the
smallest, and p(N) is the largest<br>
(3) Starting from p(N) downwards, look down for the first p(n) which is
less than or equal to (n/N) * 0.05 (or your chosen significance
level)<br>
(4) Tests 1 to n are classified as significant.<br><br>
Is this correct? Have any useful modifications been proposed? This seems
easy to implement in software, which I may well do.<br><br>
Thanks again,<br><br>
Mike L.<br><br>
Mike Linacre<br>
Editor, Rasch Measurement Transactions<br>
rmt@rasch.org
<a href="http://www.rasch.org/rmt/" eudora="autourl">www.rasch.org/rmt/</a>
Latest RMT: 19:3 Winter</blockquote><br><br>
Fred Wolfe<br>
National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases<br>
Wichita, Kansas<br>
Tel (316) 263-2125&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Fax (316) 263-0761<br>
fwolfe@arthritis-research.org<br><br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Rasch mailing list<br>
Rasch@acer.edu.au<br>
<a href="http://listserv3.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch" eudora="autourl">http://listserv3.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch</a><br>
</blockquote>
<x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
Svend Kreiner<br>
Associate professor<br>
Department of Biostatistics&nbsp; <br>
University of Copenhagen <br><br>
Blegdamsvej 3, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, DENMARK<br><br>
 From June 9, 2005:<br><br>
ุster farimagsgade 5, entr. B<br>
P.O. Box 2099<br>
DK-1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark<br><br>
Email: S.Kreiner@biostat.ku.dk<br>
Phone: (+45) 35 32 75 97&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <br><br>
Fax: (+45) 35 32 79 07<br>
</body>
</html>