<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6000.16481" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Dear Rasch colleagues,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>I'm trying to determine how many anchor items one 
needs to equate two subject-matter tests.&nbsp; I estimated 20, or 25% of total 
test, whichever is greater, based on a rule-of-thumb they used at ETS and on one 
article that found on Florida's FCAT that 15 or 20 anchor items worked as well 
as 30.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>(Note: I'm thinking here about how one would create 
a pool of items for the U.S. NCLB to form a de-facto standard of "what should be 
taught," with the pool of items forming a portion (25%) of each state's 
test.&nbsp; I realize the equating won't be perfect, but the goal is a good 
rough measure. Here is what I'm saying about the idea currently:</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>It should also be noted that&nbsp;it is impossible 
to&nbsp;precisley equate&nbsp;two tests designed to different standards.&nbsp; 
Strictly speaking, two students' scores can&nbsp; be directly compared only if 
they are being tested on the same thing.&nbsp; If&nbsp;State A emphasizes 
statistics in eighth grade math and </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>State B emphasizes geometry, it is not precisely 
possible to compare the math knowledge of students from the two states. Who is 
the more "knowledgeable" student: the one good at statistics or the one good at 
geometry?&nbsp; Thus,equated&nbsp; math (or reading) scores of State A and State 
B will be a rough reflection of how much math (reading) students know.&nbsp; If 
in a particular state students who get a lot of state test&nbsp;items correct 
also tend to&nbsp;get a lot of the more difficult&nbsp;"common core" items 
correct, then high scores on the state test will equate to very high scores on 
the common scale.&nbsp; If in a particular state many students tend to get many 
state test items correct while missing most of the"common core" items, then high 
scores on the state test will equate to somewhat lower scores on the common 
scale.)</FONT></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>So:&nbsp; I know the equating will be imperfect.&nbsp; </DIV>
<DIV>But am I correct that 20 items are sufficient for this imperfect 
equating?</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Steve Kramer</DIV>
<DIV>Math Science Partnership of Greater 
Philadelphia</DIV></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>