<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 6.5.7652.24">
<TITLE>RE: [Rasch] Not a Fan of Lexiles?</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<!-- Converted from text/plain format -->

<P><FONT SIZE=2>I can't agree with Rense more.&nbsp; Judy Wilkerson and I have a chapter on &quot;why we chose the Rasch model&quot; in a recent application.&nbsp; We agree that value-added models, data mining, etc. might eventually come to the same conclusions about teacher performance measures that we do, but it is the unique insights of misfit and rater errors that have changed our interpretation and still been understandable to the users.<BR>
<BR>
We like to say that &quot;Rasch puts the people back in testings.&quot; The revolution is not in the use of the model or a particular piece of software, but comes with the new insights that were originally revealed because the model and software encouraged a different way of thinking.&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
The Hubble telescope is still the same device that Galileo used and is still revealing new revolutionary insights.&nbsp; Only a few astronomers probably know what the latest revolutionary discoveries mean, but they are still there because of the telescope.&nbsp; We don't stop using optical telescopes simply because someone now has created a radio telescope.<BR>
<BR>
If the tool has merit, then continuing use of the tool for revolutionary discoveries is justified. Because the Rasch applications continue to develop, the model continues to produce what I consider to be revolutionary results.&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
Steve Lang<BR>
University of South Florida St. Petersburg<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
-----Original Message-----<BR>
From: rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au on behalf of Rense<BR>
Sent: Tue 10/30/2007 9:13 PM<BR>
To: 'Paul Barrett'; rasch@acer.edu.au<BR>
Subject: RE: [Rasch] Not a Fan of Lexiles?<BR>
<BR>
Paul,<BR>
<BR>
I was actually making the opposite case than you now do, namely that there<BR>
is more to measurement than adding raw scores however highly items are<BR>
correlated. Rather than doing away with quality control, equating, DIF<BR>
tests, working with incomplete data sets, CAT, item and person fit, etc. I<BR>
intended to say that addressing those issues may be more important than<BR>
obtaining a &quot;score.&quot;.<BR>
<BR>
This is not only because in many cases (i.e., with complete data) sums<BR>
correlate highly with Rasch person estimates. But, mainly because knowing<BR>
such &quot;scores&quot; may not be the most important outcome of testing. I am<BR>
currently involved in a number of projects where respondents' misfit is<BR>
identified and then used to give feedback beyond (and sometimes instead of)<BR>
the &quot;score&quot; proper. Unless one is interested only in scores on fixed content<BR>
tests, Rasch scaling is actually eminently practical even in applications<BR>
other than Lexiles etc.<BR>
<BR>
Rense Lange<BR>
<BR>
&nbsp; _____&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
From: rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au [<A HREF="mailto:rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au">mailto:rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au</A>] On Behalf<BR>
Of Paul Barrett<BR>
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2007 6:22 PM<BR>
To: rasch@acer.edu.au<BR>
Subject: RE: [Rasch] Not a Fan of Lexiles?<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Hello Mike<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
I thought they were. Which is why there are no &quot;stand out&quot; achievements or<BR>
results using Rasch/IRT (which had not already been achieved using other<BR>
methods - however approximately or clumsily) which come to mind.<BR>
<BR>
Yes, there are many applications using Rasch/IRT which show &quot;differences&quot;<BR>
between the &quot;old&quot; and &quot;new&quot; - but these differences don't seem to amount to<BR>
anything which has fundamentally changed the way we think about human<BR>
behavior or cognitions, or predictions we might have made using our<BR>
&quot;measures&quot;.<BR>
<BR>
And we've had 50 years to wait for something.<BR>
<BR>
Frankly, it is only the Metametrics work which seems to qualify for the<BR>
&quot;stand-out&quot; epithet .. and look how much of that was based upon empirical<BR>
investigations of the phenomena of interest.<BR>
<BR>
I'm not seeking to convince anyone about anything - but just commenting on<BR>
why some (like me) might just look at the eulogies for Rasch or IRT, and end<BR>
up walking away from it as a &quot;productive&quot; methodology. Largely because what<BR>
may be defined as productive in science is not relevant to how&nbsp; &quot;productive&quot;<BR>
is defined in educational or psychometrics circles?<BR>
<BR>
Regards ... Paul<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Paul Barrett, Ph.D.<BR>
<BR>
2622 East 21st Street | Tulsa, OK&nbsp; 74114<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Chief Research Scientist<BR>
<BR>
Office | 918.749.0632&nbsp; Fax | 918.749.0635<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
pbarrett@hoganassessments.com<BR>
<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
&nbsp;&lt;<A HREF="http://www.hoganassessments.com/">http://www.hoganassessments.com/</A>&gt; hoganassessments.com<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
</FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
</HTML>