<div>Hello.</div>  <div>Following the standard procedure to get the scale of a test (measures in logits vs number of correct answers), we know that two persons answering correctly M items of a single test with N items, will have the same measure B in logits (but different fit), independently of&nbsp;which&nbsp;items were answered by each person.</div>  <div>I've shown this to my colleagues, but one indicates he gets different results for two persons with 4 correct answers in a&nbsp;10 items test, if person (a) answers only the 4 hard items and person (b) answers correctly only the&nbsp;4 easy items. He promised me to send an explanation.</div>  <div>Has somebody&nbsp;found&nbsp;this result&nbsp;that does not correspond to what the Rasch model (or IRT) may explain? How can it be done if possible? This does not correspond to invariance!</div>  <div>I've seen RMT, winsteps manual, the book by Hambleton&nbsp;and&nbsp;the notes from my course with David Andrich, but I don't have
 a solution.</div>  <div>Regards</div>  <div>Agustin</div><BR><BR><DIV><FONT color=#0000bf><STRONG>FAMILIA DE PROGRAMAS KALT. </STRONG></FONT></DIV>
<DIV>Mariano Jiménez 1830 A </DIV>
<DIV>Col. Balcones del Valle </DIV>
<DIV>78280, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. México </DIV>
<DIV>TEL (52) 44-4820 37 88, 44-4820 04 31 </DIV>
<DIV>FAX (52)&nbsp;44-4815 48 48 </DIV>
<DIV>web page (in Spanish AND ENGLISH): <FONT color=#c00000><STRONG>http://www.ieesa-kalt.com</STRONG></FONT></DIV><p>&#32;__________________________________________________<br>Do You Yahoo!?<br>Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around <br>http://mail.yahoo.com