<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 6.5.7652.24">
<TITLE>RE: [Rasch] Noise in observations ...</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<!-- Converted from text/plain format -->

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Should we suggest, as in physics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle?&nbsp; Do items (as observation/measurements) have limits to EVER precisely observe the construct &quot;perfectly&quot;?<BR>
<BR>
Without reverting to skinning Schrodinger's cat, I still wonder if CTT would ever have developed the tool kit to explain measurement as well as Rasch?&nbsp; Perhaps, as Paul suggests, CTT may have developed stronger methods if someone had not been wasting time on &quot;IRT&quot;.&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
On the other hand, the question of better tools would likely never even have been asked if Ben had not written, &quot;The truth is that the so-called measurements we now make in educational testing are no damn good!&quot;. The historical evidence is not speculative.&nbsp; Rasch has improved our measurement and continues to develop as a viable model today.&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
The economic decision of which bathroom scale is the best buy is a different issue.<BR>
<BR>
Steve Lang<BR>
University of South Florida<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
-----Original Message-----<BR>
From: rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au on behalf of Mike Linacre (RMT)<BR>
Sent: Sun 11/4/2007 1:56 AM<BR>
To: rasch@acer.edu.au<BR>
Subject: [Rasch] Noise in observations ...<BR>
<BR>
Paul remarks: &quot;... can only be measured if their observations contain<BR>
sufficient noise ...&quot;<BR>
<BR>
Of course, as scientists, we endeavor to reduce irrelevant noise in the<BR>
observations in the same way as nuclear physicists do in their experiments<BR>
in Quantum Mechanics.&nbsp; But we don't trust only one observation, or<BR>
observations that are too close in agreement (recognized as the<BR>
&quot;attenuation paradox&quot; in classical test theory or &quot;wood-shedding&quot; in the<BR>
legal arena).<BR>
<BR>
We are in the same position as historians:<BR>
&quot;When considering an accumulation of evidence, the more randomness in minor<BR>
details, the stronger the sense of historical truth.&quot;<BR>
Gerd Theissen, University of Heidelberg, 1994&nbsp; (lecture given at the Luther<BR>
School of Theology, Chicago).<BR>
<BR>
We are looking for locally-independent sources of information about our<BR>
latent variable, in the same way that historians look for<BR>
locally-independent accounts of historical events.<BR>
<BR>
Mike L.<BR>
<BR>
Mike Linacre<BR>
Editor, Rasch Measurement Transactions<BR>
rmt@rasch.org www.rasch.org/rmt/ Latest RMT:&nbsp; 21:1 Summer 2007<BR>
<BR>
</FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
</HTML>