<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML xmlns:o = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office"><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6000.16587" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>In my previous email ("Rasch applied rashly") I 
asked, in essence, &nbsp;"What&nbsp;is to&nbsp;be done?"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Reflectioning on this question, it might be useful 
as a first step to test my claim that there is socially-constructed--and in fact 
curriclum-constructed--"unidimensionality" in mathematics ability.&nbsp; 
Specifically, I can see whether two different high school curricula construct 
two different (but each internally consistent) uni-dimensional versions of "math 
ability".</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Fortunately, I have a data set that might be used 
to address this question.&nbsp; Unfortunately, I need help figuring out how to 
do the analysis.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>For my dissertation, I tested four cohorts of 
students at a single high school.&nbsp; The earlier cohort used a tradional 
curriculum; the later cohorts used an integrated math curriculum called 
"IMP".&nbsp; In eleventh grade, students took a test with items that favored 
IMP-style teaching, and a test with items that favored traditional-style 
teaching.&nbsp; In twelfth grade, many of these same students took released NAEP 
items.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>I have data from over 500 students, split roughly 
evenly between the two curricula.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Research&nbsp;questions might be:</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>1. Within each curriculum group, is the full set of 
test questions "uni-dimensional"?&nbsp; If not, what dimensions are 
there?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>2. Are there demonstrable differences between the 
dimensions and ordering of item difficulties within the dimensions, depending on 
curriculum?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>3. If we assume unidimensionality, do we get very 
different item ordering and difficulties, depending on the 
curriculum?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>4. If I simulate adaptive testing (i.e. pretend 
each student takes only part of the test, even though I have complete data for 
most students), do students from curriculum A systematically get placed as lower 
ability when using item difficulties developed under the curriculum B than they 
do when using item difficulties developed under curriculum A?&nbsp; Do the 
results differ depending on whether students start with the "easy" vs. the 
"difficult" items in the simulated adaptive test?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>But I don't know how to use Rasch methods to 
analyze dimensionality, or to rigorously test it.&nbsp; I have used ConQuest to 
develop Rasch scores, but not to analyze something like this.&nbsp; Can anyone 
lead me to references that might help me do this study?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Alternatively:&nbsp; I'm short on free time, so I 
could provide someone else the data set, if they wanted to analyze it.&nbsp; Any 
takers?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Steve Kramer</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>