<div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">Hi all,<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">I’m starting the new year with one of my half-understood concepts in the Rasch model.<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">During the X-mas hols I did some reading about the “invariance” property of the Rasch model.<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN:
 justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">I found out that the logistic function can be written as a linear regression equation. In fact the ICC is the regression of raw scores on measures. Invariance is the property of the regression model. That is, the same regression line can be obtained in any subpopulation of the X variable to predict the Y variable from. This means that the slope and intercept of the regression line is the same along the variable. <o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">That’s the reason why invariance exists under Rasch model.<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT
 size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">This sounds logical to me. I mean with my weak grounding in stats and algebra I can understand it. I’d be thankful for any comments to further complicate the problem!<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><o:p><FONT face="Times New Roman" size=3>&nbsp;</FONT></o:p></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">Can this also be related to the linearity issue and a common metric and unit issue?<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">Where can I find an algebraic proof for
 invariance?<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">Cheers<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div>  <div class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify"><SPAN lang=EN-US style="COLOR: black; mso-ansi-language: EN-US"><FONT size=3><FONT face="Times New Roman">Anthony<o:p></o:p></FONT></FONT></SPAN></div><p>&#32;
      <hr size=1>Be a better friend, newshound, and 
know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. <a href="http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=51733/*http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ "> Try it now.</a>