<div dir="ltr">Steve,<div><br></div><div>Thank you for your explanation of the Rasch relationship to the Weber-Fechner law. &nbsp;Yes, it seems clear that &quot;perceptive&quot; spaces (a more precise term, perhaps, than &quot;probabilistic&quot; spaces, though Rasch used ratios of probabilities to erect non-physical spaces) have no necessary linear relationship to physical spaces, and a probable non-linear relation. &nbsp;I would expect, however, based on a few perception experiments, that perceptive spaces will <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-style: italic;">sometimes</span> have a &nbsp;linear relation to physical spaces (e.g., distance, height, weight, color intensity, etc.), depending on the type of physical space.</div>
<div><br></div><div>What is of greater interest to me, here, is the role of invariance as it relates to linearity. &nbsp;A Rasch analysis of perceptions of height may fully satisfy the requirements of invariance. &nbsp;A physical analysis of height may also satisfy the requirements of invariance. &nbsp;Yet the perceptual measures and physical measures may have a non-linear relationship to each other. &nbsp;The conclusion seems straightforward. &nbsp;Satisfaction of the Rasch definition of invariance does not guarantee a linear relationship between invariant measures derived from different modalities (e.g., &quot;perceptive&quot; and &quot;physical&quot;).&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div><div>This leads to the following questions: &nbsp;What geometrical relationships <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-style: italic;">does</span> invariance require? &nbsp;Does it require <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-style: italic;">any</span>? &nbsp;Does it matter?</div>
<div><br></div><div>A thought experiment: &nbsp;A set of humans and a set of robots are given the task of comparing the same set of objects. &nbsp;a) What is the relative spacing of the objects when calibrated separately for the two types of perceivers? &nbsp;b) If the robots and humans space the objects differently (e.g., nonlinearly), what happens if we do a Rasch analysis of the humans and robots together, rating the objects? &nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div><div>Will the data misfit the model?</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Mark Moulton</div><div>Educational Data Systems</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jul 18, 2008 at 7:00 PM,  &lt;<a href="mailto:rasch-request@acer.edu.au">rasch-request@acer.edu.au</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Send Rasch mailing list submissions to<br>
 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="mailto:rasch@acer.edu.au">rasch@acer.edu.au</a><br>
<br>
To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit<br>
 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="http://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch" target="_blank">http://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch</a><br>
or, via email, send a message with subject or body &#39;help&#39; to<br>
 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="mailto:rasch-request@acer.edu.au">rasch-request@acer.edu.au</a><br>
<br>
You can reach the person managing the list at<br>
 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="mailto:rasch-owner@acer.edu.au">rasch-owner@acer.edu.au</a><br>
<br>
When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific<br>
than &quot;Re: Contents of Rasch digest...&quot;<br>
<br>
<br>
Today&#39;s Topics:<br>
<br>
 &nbsp; 1. Re: Rasch analysis of interval data (Stephen Humphry)<br>
<br>
<br>
----------------------------------------------------------------------<br>
<br>
Message: 1<br>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2008 04:54:22 +0800<br>
From: Stephen Humphry &lt;<a href="mailto:shumphry@cyllene.uwa.edu.au">shumphry@cyllene.uwa.edu.au</a>&gt;<br>
Subject: Re: [Rasch] Rasch analysis of interval data<br>
To: <a href="mailto:rasch@acer.edu.au">rasch@acer.edu.au</a><br>
Message-ID: &lt;<a href="mailto:20080719045422.zq03n8hlc8oc0c00@webmail-5.ucs.uwa.edu.au">20080719045422.zq03n8hlc8oc0c00@webmail-5.ucs.uwa.edu.au</a>&gt;<br>
Content-Type: text/plain; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; charset=ISO-8859-1; &nbsp; &nbsp; DelSp=&quot;Yes&quot;;<br>
 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;format=&quot;flowed&quot;<br>
<br>
<br>
Mark, Thurstone argued Weber&#39;s law gives Fechner&#39;s &#39;law&#39; when the<br>
discriminal dispersions are equal for all stimuli, as in Case V of the<br>
law of comparative judgment. In this case, the Bradley-Terry-Luce<br>
model also holds, which has the form of the Rasch model with only one<br>
kind of parameter.<br>
<br>
To the extent the &quot;Weber-Fechner&quot; law holds, therefore, the Rasch<br>
model holds, and the relationship between physical and perceptual<br>
magnitudes of stimuli is not linear; rather it is logarithmic.<br>
Nevertheless, it is likely to appear linear within a relatively small<br>
range.<br>
<br>
&gt; A question I would like to answer is: &nbsp;&quot;Under what<br>
&gt; conditions must a probabilistic space correspond to a &quot;physical&quot; space, or<br>
&gt; to any other space.&quot; &nbsp;I think an effort to answer this question rigorously<br>
&gt; would prove very fruitful.<br>
<br>
Clearly, there are good reasons to suspect some correspondence between<br>
the perception of certain physical quantities and actual<br>
three-dimensional physical space. Examples are the perception of the<br>
locations of objects and sounds in physical space. However, I think it<br>
is unfortunate that coexistent dimensions are invoked so commonly in<br>
the social sciences in situations in which there is no connection to<br>
three-dimensional physical space, and in the absence of any compelling<br>
theory with direct empircal evicence to support it.<br>
<br>
Although I&#39;m not sure what you mean by a probabilistic space in this<br>
context, I agree that an effort to rigorously answer this kind of a<br>
question would prove fruitful.<br>
<br>
Steve<br>
ting Mark Moulton &lt;<a href="mailto:markhmoulton@gmail.com">markhmoulton@gmail.com</a>&gt;:<br>
<br>
&gt; Anthony,<br>
&gt; I did a number of experiments in this vein, almost exactly as you described.<br>
&gt; &nbsp;I did indeed find that my Rasch logit measures had a strong linear<br>
&gt; relationship with centimeter measures. &nbsp;While this was suggestive as a<br>
&gt; demonstration, and spurred me to carry the analogy between Rasch measurement<br>
&gt; and spatial geometry quite a bit further, it does not constitute proof that<br>
&gt; Rasch measures must necessarily correspond to such &quot;physical&quot; measures in a<br>
&gt; strictly linear way. &nbsp;A question I would like to answer is: &nbsp;&quot;Under what<br>
&gt; conditions must a probabilistic space correspond to a &quot;physical&quot; space, or<br>
&gt; to any other space.&quot; &nbsp;I think an effort to answer this question rigorously<br>
&gt; would prove very fruitful.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Mark Moulton<br>
&gt; Educational Data Systems<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; 2008/7/16 Anthony James &lt;<a href="mailto:luckyantonio2003@yahoo.com">luckyantonio2003@yahoo.com</a>&gt;:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Hi all,<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Has anyone ever tried to Rasch analyse a variable for which there&#39;s<br>
&gt;&gt; concatenation-based objective measurement? Suppose we make a height scale<br>
&gt;&gt; with 6 points:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Very short (1), short (2), average height (3), quite tall (4), rather all<br>
&gt;&gt; (5), Very Tall (6)<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; We measure some people with this scale and then Rasch analyses it and<br>
&gt;&gt; obtain Rasch height measures. How do these measures compare with persons&#39;<br>
&gt;&gt; heights in centimeters or inches? Does the Rasch measure difference between<br>
&gt;&gt; a person who is 170 cm and a person who is 175cm equal to the Rasch measure<br>
&gt;&gt; difference between a person who is 180cm and one who is 185cm?<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; I&#39;d love to see what happens. Pairing persons&#39; heights in cm and their<br>
&gt;&gt; Rasch heights simultaneously on a vertical line and comparing the<br>
&gt;&gt; calibrations give a good test of Rasch&#39;s interval scaling, I guess.<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Cheers<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Anthony<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt;&gt; Rasch mailing list<br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="mailto:Rasch@acer.edu.au">Rasch@acer.edu.au</a><br>
&gt;&gt; <a href="http://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch" target="_blank">http://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch</a><br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
------------------------------<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Rasch mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Rasch@acer.edu.au">Rasch@acer.edu.au</a><br>
<a href="http://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch" target="_blank">http://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/rasch</a><br>
<br>
<br>
End of Rasch Digest, Vol 36, Issue 18<br>
*************************************<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div></div>