<html>
Theo, thank you for your question about explained variance.<br><br>
If we know our testing situation, we can predict the variance explained
using the nomogram at
<a href="http://www.rasch.org/rmt/rmt221j.htm" eudora="autourl">www.rasch.org/rmt/rmt221j.htm<br><br>
</a>For instance,&nbsp; <br>
Item measure S.D. is 1 logit. Person S.D. is 1 logit. Targeting is 1
logit. The nomogram predicts: 25% explained variance<br>
Item measure S.D. is 2 logit. Person S.D. is 2 logit. Targeting is 1
logit. The nomogram predicts: 50% explained variance<br>
Item measure S.D. is 4 logit. Person S.D. is 4 logit. Targeting is 1
logit. The nomogram predicts: 75% explained variance<br><br>
The first factor in the residuals is unlikely to be guessing unless the
guessing correlates across several items. It is more likely to be a
shared sub-dimension, such as word-problems in arithmetic.<br><br>
Mike L.<br><br>
At 10/20/2008, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite>Are there any established standards
for the percentage of variance we&nbsp; <br>
would like to see explained by the Rasch measure? Our cognitive&nbsp;
<br>
developmental assessments run 70%-80%, but for conventional tests
we&nbsp; <br>
have worked with the value is often lower than 30%.<br><br>
Also, for multiple choice tests, would it be typical for the first&nbsp;
<br>
factor from the residuals to have something to do with 
guessing?<br><br>
Theo<br>
</blockquote>
<x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
Mike Linacre<br>
Editor, Rasch Measurement Transactions<br>
rmt@rasch.org
<a href="http://www.rasch.org/rmt/" eudora="autourl"><font color="#0000FF"><u>www.rasch.org/rmt/</a></u></font>
Latest RMT:&nbsp; 22:1 Summer 2008</html>