<html>
Thank you for the clarification, Kate.<br><br>
The Test Information Function (TIF) is equivalent to the computation of a
standard error (precision) for every raw-score and every person measure
on the test. This is much more than CTT, which gives us an average
standard error across all the raw scores on a test (expressed as a
reliability index). <br><br>
The TIF reports on precision, not on fit. Chi-squares report on fit, not
on precision.<br><br>
Here are three test design philosophies:<br>
1. We want roughly equal measurement precision across a wide range of
person measures. For this, the more uniform the distribution of items on
the latent variable the better .<br>
or<br>
2. We want higher precision (certainty) on person measures near
cut-points (pass-fail points). For this, we need the items to pile up
around the cut-points.<br>
or<br>
3. We want the precision of this test to be the same as the precision of
another test for all scores/measures. For this, we select items which
produce matching TIFs.<br><br>
OK?<br><br>
Does anyone else have input into this topic?<br><br>
Mike Linacre<br><br>
At 10/27/2009, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite><font face="tahoma" size=2>Dear
Mike, </font><br>
&nbsp;<br>
<font face="tahoma" size=2>Thank you very much for your reply. My
question was about Test Information Function.&nbsp; Is it necessary to
evaluate the precision of the measures? I was reading a book Data
Analysis Multivariate Social Science Data and found that many examples of
IRT it uses for analysing Likert scale data have not even been given any
information about the Test Information but fit index such as Chi-Square.
I understood that the Test Information is supposed to be one of the
advantages of the IRT compared to CTT, but is it used much in practice
for purposes other than designing a ability test? </font><br>
&nbsp;<br>
<font face="tahoma" size=2>Thanks! </font><br>
&nbsp;<br>
<font face="tahoma" size=2>Kate</font></blockquote></html>