<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 6.5.7653.38">
<TITLE>RE: [Rasch] Number of categories</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<!-- Converted from text/plain format -->

<P><FONT SIZE=2>Purya<BR>
<BR>
That may be the case, and thus I suggest you try to determine whether or not respondents can make clear distinctions between categories added at the top.<BR>
<BR>
For example, there are many examples of items that make use of the traditional &quot;Strongly Disagree&quot; to &quot;Strongly Agree&quot; scale.&nbsp; Depending upon the way in which the statement is written, most if not all respondents may select &quot;Strongly Agree.&quot;&nbsp; This could suggest that if we could better elaborate levels of Agreement we might be able to more finely tune the responses.&nbsp; This would however be true only if the following conditions were met:<BR>
<BR>
(1) The respondents did not, in fact, mean they agreed with the top of the scale.&nbsp; If they did, adding four more points would simply lead them to choose the top of those new four categories.<BR>
<BR>
(2) The categories could be well-defined so that the differences among the categories could be understood and used consistently by the respondents.&nbsp; For instance, if we took &quot;Agree&quot; to &quot;Strongly Agree&quot; and decided to add four categories, we would need to ensure that the four categories could be elaborated with clear and unambiguous terms that all respondents could understand.&nbsp; This may be harder to accomplish than it seems.&nbsp; Simply adding numbers without descriptions is not likely to work.&nbsp; Instead, descriptions are likely necessary. If neither approach works, you will then wind up collapsing the categories into the original four (or some incarnation of the same) anyway - and since collapsing always carries with it certain assumptions that may not be true, in this case it would be better to have left them the same.<BR>
<BR>
Why not add the four or five points to the scale and try piloting the revised instrument with 25 or so people.&nbsp; That should be enough of a sample to determine whether or not he scale is working at all.<BR>
<BR>
I have found that most problems such as the one you described, are better solved by considering the construct/variable and the item arrangement.&nbsp; What does the gap represent?&nbsp; Is it simply an artifact of an eccentric item or two on the extreme of the distribution?&nbsp; Are the items meaningfully at the extreme as well as statistically?&nbsp; If so, what do they mean?&nbsp; What are the commonalities?&nbsp; What sorts of concepts could be covered by items written to assess the gap, therefore rendering the very extreme items not so extreme?&nbsp; Personally, I find it of great importance to evaluate the meaning, the content, the variable, and the intent at the same time, as each can help inform the other.<BR>
<BR>
All the best,<BR>
Gregory<BR>
<BR>
Gregory E. Stone, Ph.D., M.A.<BR>
<BR>
Associate Professor of Research and Measurement<BR>
Judith Herb College of Education&nbsp;&nbsp; University of Toledo, MS #921<BR>
Toledo, OH 43606&nbsp;&nbsp; 419-530-7224<BR>
<BR>
\Board of Directors, American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; www.abcte.org<BR>
For information about the Research and Measurement Programs at The University of Toledo and careers in psychometrics, statistics and evaluation, email gregory.stone@utoledo.edu.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
-----Original Message-----<BR>
From: rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au on behalf of Purya Baghaei<BR>
Sent: Sat 1/2/2010 3:31 AM<BR>
To: Kenji Yamazaki<BR>
Cc: rasch<BR>
Subject: Re: [Rasch] Number of categories<BR>
<BR>
Gregory,<BR>
<BR>
Since there are 5 categories on the scale many respondents who are<BR>
<BR>
higher than category 5 on some of the items all should be rated 5.<BR>
<BR>
That is, the number of categories doesn't allow a finer distinction<BR>
<BR>
among these respondents. Increasing the number of categories results<BR>
<BR>
in the endorsement of different levels of the scale by higher ability<BR>
<BR>
respondents. I assume this results in more variation in the total raw<BR>
<BR>
scores for items and gives a wider spread of item estimates and covers<BR>
<BR>
the empty regions of the scale. The distance between the last two<BR>
<BR>
thresholds is more than 4 logits. So the respondents seem to be able<BR>
<BR>
to distinguish more categories.<BR>
<BR>
Regards<BR>
<BR>
Purya<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
</FONT>
</P>

-------------------------------------------------<p></p>
Please consider the environment before you print
</BODY>
</HTML>