<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40" xmlns:o = 
"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w = 
"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word"><HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<TITLE>Message</TITLE>

<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2900.3698" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE>@page Section1 {size: 8.5in 11.0in; margin: 1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; }
P.MsoNormal {
        FONT-SIZE: 12pt; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman"
}
LI.MsoNormal {
        FONT-SIZE: 12pt; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman"
}
DIV.MsoNormal {
        FONT-SIZE: 12pt; MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; FONT-FAMILY: "Times New Roman"
}
A:link {
        COLOR: blue; TEXT-DECORATION: underline
}
SPAN.MsoHyperlink {
        COLOR: blue; TEXT-DECORATION: underline
}
A:visited {
        COLOR: purple; TEXT-DECORATION: underline
}
SPAN.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {
        COLOR: purple; TEXT-DECORATION: underline
}
SPAN.EmailStyle17 {
        COLOR: windowtext; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-style-type: personal-compose
}
DIV.Section1 {
        page: Section1
}
</STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY lang=EN-US vLink=purple link=blue>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=2>Dear 
Ranganath</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=2>This 
is quite a mouth full! It is not only for CAT, but for all serious item banking 
work. If you use classical statistics and calculate the item difficulty and 
discrimination (point biserial correlation) you will have some sample dependent 
information. However, these can change significantly if you administer the same 
item to another cohort in another test. To counter this, equating is needed. 
Although classical equating methods yield some results, modern test theory is 
much more robust and sophisticated.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=2>After 
administration of a test you do a calibration, i.e. derive item difficulty 
estimates and person ability estimates. Depending on which model you use, you 
will get one, two, three parameters for each item and ability estimates relative 
to this on the same scale. Be careful, Rasch usually standardises on item 
difficulty and IRT models on person ability. You cannot simply cross over to 
another model once you have calibrated one data set. The problem is that this 
scale is "unique" so if you calibrate some items with some other items in a 
second administration, the common items will have different parameters. An 
equating process is required to get them on a common scale. This is how you 
build an item bank on one scale so that you can use any subset of items to 
obtain comparable ability estimates. You can see that it is not simply a process 
of taking the average!</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=2>CAT is 
a different ball game - it is a sophisticated application which requires items 
to be on a common scale. It is an efficient way to administer less items without 
compromising precision. In "conventional" testing, if you want to compile 
different tests and compare abilities (performance), the items in the bank you 
use must have been equated to a common scale or you have to do the equating 
afterwards with common items, people or an external exercise. (We actually talk 
about the linking of items and equating of abilities.)</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=2></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=2>Regards</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390461905-21062010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=2>John</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV><!-- Converted from text/plain format -->
<P><FONT size=2>Prof John J Barnard (DEd;PhD;EdD)<BR>Executive Director: EPEC 
Pty Ltd<BR>CEO: CAT Measures Pty Ltd<BR>ASC: Asia, Africa and 
Australia<BR>Honorary Faculty UCT; Adj. USyd<BR><BR><BR>It is the responsibility 
of the recipient(s) to ensure that the e-mail is virus free. Although antiviral 
software is used, no responsibility is accepted for any problems caused by 
viruses. </FONT></P>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV></DIV>
  <DIV class=OutlookMessageHeader lang=en-us dir=ltr align=left><FONT 
  face=Tahoma size=2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> 
  rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au [mailto:rasch-bounces@acer.edu.au] <B>On Behalf Of 
  </B>ranganaths<BR><B>Sent:</B> Monday, 21 June 2010 3:13 PM<BR><B>To:</B> 
  rasch@acer.edu.au<BR><B>Subject:</B> [Rasch] Re-calibration 
  Procedure<BR><BR></FONT></DIV>
  <DIV class=Section1>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Hello,<o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
  It is well known that in the case of CAT, for the item to be included in the 
  item bank, It needs to be calibrated and this happens over a period of time on 
  administering the item in various tests. Say for eg, we have administered 
  test1, test2&#8230; &nbsp;testn the same question Q1. The item Q1 gets item 
  parameter value a1,b1 and c1 in test1. The response vector being v1 for the 
  item Q1 in test1. In the successive tests should the response vectors(v1,v2 &#8230; 
  vn) for the same item Q1 be merged with the previous test response to get the 
  calibrated value of a1, b1 and c1.<o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
  OR<o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Is it enough to have the a1, b1 
  and c1 value and then proceed having similar values for the item in different 
  tests and then take average of the corresponding values to arrive at the final 
  a, b and c values.<o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Regards,<o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></P>
  <P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
  style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Ranganath 
  S</SPAN></FONT><o:p></o:p></P></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>