Thank you, Mike. Yes, the items can be spiralled, and there is ongoing intervention during the period of administration. Thank your for your suggestion to explore rater leniency. I will pursue this direction.<br><br>Sincerely,<br>
<br>Jacob<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Sep 25, 2010 at 9:06 AM, Mike Linacre <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rmt@rasch.org">rmt@rasch.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
Jacob:<br>
<br>
You describe an exciting situation. A couple of questions:<br>
<br>
1. Could the math items be spiralled so that different students respond to different items on different days?<br>
<br>
2. Is there an intervention during the administration (such as math teaching)?<br>
<br>
Let&#39;s assume the items are spiralled in some way, and there is an intervention which operates uniformly across the students, then we could estimate this Rasch model:<br>
<br>
(baseline ability of person n) + (learning effect up to day d) - (difficulty of item i) -&gt; observation<br>
<br>
This parallels studies of changes in rater leniency across rating sessions.<br><font color="#888888">
<br>
Mike Linacre<br>
<a href="mailto:mike@winsteps.com" target="_blank">mike@winsteps.com</a></font><div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
At 9/25/2010, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
Hello-<br>
<br>
Can anyone point me to an example where a Rasch model was used to evaluate unique test items administered over a series of days? For example, could a Rasch model be used to calibrate a math test delivered two items per day over the course of a couple of weeks? If this is a reasonable goal, what are the pitfalls?<br>

<br>
Thank you for your input.<br>
<br>
Jacob Kean<br>
</blockquote>
<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>