Hi Tim,<div><br></div><div>Well, your items almost certainly will NOT be of equal difficulty - and Facets has a statistical test that will tell you if this is so. But, they might be &quot;close enough&quot; for some purposes perhaps - although I&#39;m doubtful about that too.<div>
<br></div><div>Of course, you might constrain all items to be of the same difficulty (say, 0), and see what happens to the item / model fit and item displacement.</div><div><br></div><div>Just to be sure: if you are making this unrealistic equality assumption because you believe that this is needed for &quot;equivalent&quot; forms or test results or something like that, then don&#39;t do this. There are much better ways to deal with such situations ...</div>
<div><br></div><div>Rense Lange<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Dec 10, 2010 at 3:44 PM, Tom Conner <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:connert@msu.edu">connert@msu.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Consider that you have a set of items, in my case vignettes, that are<br>
superficially different but you would like them to all have the same<br>
item difficulty within error.  How do you test for that?  The responses<br>
to the vignettes are polytomous.<br>
<br>
Tom<br>
<br>
--<br>
Tom Conner<br>
Professor of Sociology<br>
Michigan State University<br>
office: 517 355-1747<br>
cell: 517 230-0343<br>
&quot;What if there were no hypothetical questions?&quot;<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Rasch mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Rasch@acer.edu.au">Rasch@acer.edu.au</a><br>
Unsubscribe: <a href="https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/rense.lange%40gmail.com" target="_blank">https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/rense.lange%40gmail.com</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Rense Lange, Ph.D.<br>via gmail<br>
</div></div>