<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    <font face="Times New Roman">Dear A &amp; T.<br>
      <br>
      A ratio scale is a scale where the unit of measurement is
      arbitrary. Comparisons of measurements by <i>ratios</i> are
      therefore invariant  in  the sense that they do not depend on  the
      unit of measurement.  <br>
      <br>
      Rasch (1960) himself asserted this. You can find discussions of
      this in Chapter II, Section 3 and in Chapter V he talks about the
      meaning of statements like "one person has <i>twice</i> the
      ability of another" and he says that the probability of the RM is
      a function of the <i>ratio</i> (not the difference) between the
      degree of ability of the person and the difficulty of the problem.
      And in Chapter VII (pages 109-110) where he says that he
      "undertook, along general lines, a discussion of what may
      "reasonably" be read into such concepts as measuring on a ratio
      scale "the ability of a person" and the "difficulty of a
      problem"." And later, page 115) "<i>Where this law can be applied
        it provides a principle of measurement on a ratio scale of both
        stimulus and object parameters</i>" (Rasch's italics).<br>
      <br>
      He never talked about interval scales, and you could argue that
      the logit scale is not a proper interval scales but just a
      logarithmic ratio scale because a true interval scale has both an
      arbitrary origin and an arbitrary unit. On the logit scale as
      such, there is no unit. Or there was no unit before Steven
      Humphrey defined his Rasch models for multiple frameworks.<br>
      <br>
      Best<br>
      <br>
      Svend<br>
    </font><br>
    <br>
    Den 08-03-2011 12:27, Bond, Trevor skrev:
    <blockquote cite="mid:C99C4FC8.F46%25trevor.bond@jcu.edu.au"
      type="cite">
      <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;
        charset=windows-1252">
      <title>Re: [Rasch] Odds ratio as a scale</title>
      <font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><span
          style="font-size: 11pt;"><br>
        </span></font>
      <blockquote><font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><span
            style="font-size: 11pt;">Dear Anthony<br>
          </span><span style="font-size: 12pt;">May I possibly have some
            explanations on why odds ratio is a ratio scale measure?<br>
             <br>
            I think you misconstrue...a ratio measurement scale and the
            mathematical ratio between the probabilities you mention are
            two entirely different concepts.<br>
            I doubt that anyone could seriously assert that RM produces
            ratio scale measurement – some claim it produces interval
            level measurement scales.<br>
            best<br>
            T<br>
          </span><span style="font-size: 11pt;"> <br>
          </span></font></blockquote>
      <pre wrap="">
<fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
_______________________________________________
Rasch mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Rasch@acer.edu.au">Rasch@acer.edu.au</a>
Unsubscribe: <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/s.kreiner%40biostat.ku.dk">https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/s.kreiner%40biostat.ku.dk</a></pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Svend Kreiner
Professor
Department of Biostatistics  
University of Copenhagen 

Øster farimagsgade 5, entr. B
P.O. Box 2099
DK-1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark

Email: <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:S.Kreiner@biostat.ku.dk">S.Kreiner@biostat.ku.dk</a>
Phone: (+45) 35 32 75 97     

Fax: (+45) 35 32 79 07
</pre>
  </body>
</html>