Michael,<div><br></div><div>The way I understand your coding is that you &quot;baked&quot; items&#39; difficulty right into the numbers. What I would do is to take that out again first. This is not really hard, if I understand things correctly, and if a common rating scale was used.</div>
<div><br></div><div>For instance, if item 6 had difficulty 5 and the rating was 3, you had coded: 3*5=15. So, just divide these rating products by their item&#39;s difficulty index. Then run winsteps over rating scales / partial credit items. Next, compare the whether items Rasch difficulty order is the same as the one you had in mind when you started multiplying. You&#39;d like them to match ...</div>
<div><br></div><div>Rense</div><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 13, 2011 at 1:30 PM, Michael Lamport Commons <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:commons@tiac.net">commons@tiac.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<br>
Here&#39;s my question about the Rasch analysis.<br>
<br>
Question:<br>
<br>
We have been trying to measure participants&#39; stages of development via<br>
surveys that participants to rate their preference for vignettes that<br>
differ in their order of hierarchical complexity on a 1 to 6 scale.. The<br>
vignettes are stories which show characters behaving at particular<br>
stages. My first assumption which I am not sure is an appropriate<br>
assumption, is that the items of greater difficulty -- higher order of<br>
hierarchical complexity) will rate. To analyze the data following Bond<br>
and Fox, we multiplied the response codes (Likert-scale-esque numbers<br>
1-6) by item orders of hierarchical complexity to attain a weighted<br>
score. We then run a Rasch analysis on the weighted scores.<br>
<br>
Is Rasch analysis appropriate for this form of instrument. The &quot;best&quot;<br>
one can score on in rating a vignette instrument is 6 on the highest<br>
order question. But let us say the participant rates 6 on every item,<br>
even those lower in order of hierarchical complexity and therefore<br>
difficulty. According to our measurement system, the &quot;best&quot; one can<br>
score is 6 on every item. Rasch inherently assumes that all items<br>
measure the same thing, and that their measurement is INDEPENDENT of the<br>
other items, but this is clearly not the case. Am I wrong, and is Rasch<br>
appropriate here?<br>
<br>
My Best,<br>
<br>
Michael Lamport Commons, Ph.D.<br>
Assistant Clinical Professor<br>
<br>
Department of Psychiatry<br>
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center<br>
Harvard Medical School<br>
234 Huron Avenue<br>
Cambridge, MA 02138-1328<br>
<br>
Telephone  <a href="tel:%28617%29%20497-5270" value="+16174975270">(617) 497-5270</a><br>
Facsimile  <a href="tel:%28617%29%20491-5270" value="+16174915270">(617) 491-5270</a><br>
Cellular  <a href="tel:%28617%29%20320%E2%80%930896" value="+16173200896">(617) 3200896</a><br>
<a href="mailto:Commons@tiac.net">Commons@tiac.net</a><br>
<a href="http://dareassociation.org/" target="_blank">http://dareassociation.org/</a><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Rasch mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Rasch@acer.edu.au">Rasch@acer.edu.au</a><br>
Unsubscribe: <a href="https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/rense.lange%40gmail.com" target="_blank">https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/rense.lange%40gmail.com</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Rense Lange, Ph.D.<br>via gmail<br>