Kenji,<br><br>An interesting question, I have never really thought about.<br><br>Basically what you need is an s-shaped curve to describe/model the relationship between the latent variable and the expected manifest response (probability). Originally IRT used the cumulative normal distribution. For convenience, the standard normal was used (it has to have some standard deviation, so why not make it one). Later the logistic function replaced the normal (logit rather than probit) as it is much easier to work with while being virtually identical with the standard normal provided you include the scaling constant D (roughly 1.7), as it is still done in many (all?) IRT applications.<br>
<br>In Rasch modeling we do not use D, although we could. The point is that a multiplicative constant is just a scaling factor. <br><br>But now to your question. It seems to me that a base other than e <br>simply means that the measures are expressed in a different unit.<br>
<br>If you choose a different base, let&#39;s call it f (with f &gt; 1), then you get the same probabilities that you get with e as the base but with a scaling constant of a=ln(f).<br><br>Best wishes,<br>Thomas<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">
2011/9/5 Kenji Yamazaki <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:yk0271@yahoo.co.jp">yk0271@yahoo.co.jp</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
<tbody><tr><td style="font:inherit" valign="top"><p class="MsoNormal"><span>Hi all:<u></u><u></u></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span> <u></u><u></u></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span>I have a question about the formula of the Rasch or IRT model.<span>  </span>Why is e (=2.718) used in the formula?<span>  </span>Why is not it 10?<span>  </span>Because e is close to 3, why isn’t 3 used for the formula instead
of e?<span>  </span>I have been having this question for
a long time, but all the Rasch and IRT books I have read treat </span>as given <span>the use of e (=2.718) in the formula.<span>  </span></span><span>If anyone gives me an answer,
it will be very appreciated.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><br></p><font color="#888888"><p class="MsoNormal">Kenji </p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><br></p><blockquote style="border-left:2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255);margin-left:5px;padding-left:5px"><div></div></blockquote></font></td></tr></tbody></table><br>_______________________________________________<br>

Rasch mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Rasch@acer.edu.au">Rasch@acer.edu.au</a><br>
Unsubscribe: <a href="https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/thomas.salzberger%40gmail.com" target="_blank">https://mailinglist.acer.edu.au/mailman/options/rasch/thomas.salzberger%40gmail.com</a><br></blockquote>
</div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>___________________________________<br><a href="mailto:Thomas.Salzberger@gmail.com" target="_blank">Thomas.Salzberger@gmail.com</a><br><a href="mailto:Thomas.Salzberger@wu.ac.at" target="_blank">Thomas.Salzberger@wu.ac.at</a><br>
<br><br>