<html><head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=Windows-1252"><title>Re: [Rasch] Negative pt-bis and fit of 1.0? How can this be?</title>
</head>
<body>
<font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><span style="font-size:11pt">Dear Gregory et alii<br>
You wrote (inter alia)<br>
<br>
</span></font><blockquote><font face="Calibri, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><span style="font-size:11pt">Sending this to you and not the listserv. &nbsp;(whoops) &nbsp;... regardless of whether we accept the largely arbitrary range of fit so popularized in books like Bond and Fox, or the more rational fit calculated by folks like Smith.<br>
<br>
It’s drag being popular...or least being guilty of popularising the largely arbitrary range of fit.<br>
<br>
</span></font><font color="#474747"><font face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size:11.5pt">Still a man hears what he wants to hear <br>
And disregards the rest (Simon &amp; Garfunkel)<br>
p242<br>
</span></font></font><font size="2"><font face="Helvetica, Verdana, Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt">The interpretation of fit statistics, more than any other aspect of Rasch modeling,<br>
requires experience related to the particular measurement context. Then,<br>
“[w]hen is a mean-square too large or too small? There are no hard-and-fast rules.<br>
Particular features of a testing situation, for example, mixing item types or off-target<br>
testing, can produce different mean-square distributions. Nevertheless, here,<br>
as a rule of thumb, are some reasonable ranges for item mean-square fit statistics”<br>
(Wright, Linacre, Gustafsson, &amp; Martin-Loff, 1994; Table 12.6). <b>Unfortunately,<br>
many readers will scour this text merely to cite the page to support that the fit values<br>
they have reported are within some acceptable bounds.<br>
<br>
</b>p243<br>
So while a set of general guidelines like those above will be helpful for<br>
researchers embarking on Rasch modeling, a considerable bibliography of relevant<br>
material exists. Articles published by Smith (e.g., 1991a, 1994, 2000) provide<br>
good starting points for a more thoroughly informed view of issues concerning fit<br>
statistic interpretation.<br>
<br>
Indeed, that very chapter starts:<br>
It would be difficult to deny the claim that the most contentious issue in Rasch<br>
measurement circles is that of fit.<br>
<br>
I guess we could have been more circumspect, but I don’t know how. Cos, <b>[u]nfortunately,<br>
many readers will scour this text merely to cite the page to support that the fit values<br>
they have reported are within some acceptable bounds.<br>
</b></span></font></font><font color="#474747"><font face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size:11.5pt">Still a man hears what he wants to hear <br>
And disregards the rest (Simon &amp; Garfunkel)<br>
</span></font></font><font size="2"><font face="Helvetica, Verdana, Arial"><span style="font-size:10pt"><br>
Collegial regards<br>
TGB</span></font></font></blockquote>
</body>
</html>