<html>
Jason:<br><br>
You are using a &quot;minimum effort&quot; judging plan.<br>
1. Each students answers several questions.<br>
2. Each question is rated once<br>
3. Each question for each student is rated by a different 
rater.<br><br>
The result is a &quot;crossed&quot; (=connected) design. There is no
nesting.<br><br>
Facets (or any other Rasch analysis) can estimate the Rasch measures of
all the students, questions and raters unambiguously in one frame of
reference.<br><br>
This is also shown at
<a href="http://www.rasch.org/rn3.htm" eudora="autourl">http://www.rasch.org/rn3.htm</a>
Figure A.8 and elsewhere.<i> And thank you, Trevor :-)<br><br>
</i>OK?<br><br>
Mike L.<br><br>
At 4/2/2012, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite>I am running a &quot;typical&quot; scenario where I have markers who mark the responses of students to a test. The markers do not see the whole test, but only individual questions. We do NOT have double marking. So, lets say that we have 1000 students, each one responding to 10 questions. In effect, we have 10.000 responses. Lets say that each one of the 10.000 responses is randomly sent once to one marker. We have 20 markers in total.<br>
</blockquote>
<x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
Mike Linacre<br>
Editor, Rasch Measurement Transactions<br>
rmt@rasch.org <a href="http://www.rasch.org/rmt/" eudora="autourl"><font color="#0000FF"><u>www.rasch.org/rmt/</a></u></font> Latest RMT: 25:4 Spring 2012</html>